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National CRNA Week – Student Spotlight

By on Jan 28, 2015 in National Nurse Anesthetist Week, Student Success | 0 comments

In honor of National CRNA Week, we’re highlighting a few of our TANA members.  Meet student member Courtney E. Yamber.  Here’s her story about how she came to live in and love Tennessee, what she likes most about providing anesthesia care to patients, and her advice for her fellow SRNAs. Courtney E. Yamber   I am a junior SRNA at the University of Tennessee Knoxville class of 2016. My choice to become a UT Volunteer may be hard to believe as I am a native Floridian and BSN graduate of the University of Florida Gators. However, the University of Tennessee is a perfect fit for me; I love my school, my professors, my classmates and the endless opportunities that are molding me into a future CRNA. I have also fallen for the state of Tennessee as my new home; I love the mountains and cooler weather with the change of seasons. This move to Tennessee is permanent. Prior to pursuing my dream of becoming a CRNA, I worked as a nurse for UF Health at Shands in Gainesville, Florida, on the Burn ICU. I am excited to join a field that is so patient-focused in such critical situations. Procedures requiring anesthesia can be especially frightening and disconcerting for both the patient and their loved ones. As a SRNA I am learning to independently provide attentive anesthesia with the utmost importance directed towards patient safety, as well as developing trust and security with my patients to ease their uncertainties and fears. I encourage future SRNAs to pursue the career of CRNA with passion and boldness and to be steadfast in your search for knowledge and desire to care for the patients who need you most....

MTSA and Halyard Health Launch ON-Q Center of Excellence

By on Jan 23, 2015 in Student Success | 2 comments

Madison, Tenn. (November 20, 2014) – The Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA) and Halyard Health (formerly Kimberly-Clark Health Care), a medical technology company that provides innovative healthcare solutions focused on preventing infection, eliminating pain and speeding recovery, are collaborating to launch the nation’s first peer-to-peer Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) Center of Excellence housed within a school. The new Center, now open on MTSA’s Madison, Tenn. campus, will be dedicated to the education of nurse anesthetists in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) with Halyard Health’s ON-Q Pain Relief System – used primarily to treat acute pain. With Halyard Health’s ON-Q non-narcotic portable Pain Relief System, the local anesthetics pain relieving methods that physicians may use during surgery are available for use after surgery, both at the hospital and at home. MTSA’s Center of Excellence will train CRNA’s how to use this innovative technology that allows local anesthetic to be delivered right to where the pain is, reducing the chance of the side effects commonly associated with narcotics. “MTSA has built a strong program and has allied with Halyard Health as a respected partner because it is time for CRNAs to become more proactive concerning their patient’s acute pain management,” said MTSA Program Administrator Chris Hulin, CRNA, MBA, DNP. “Properly managing patient pain before, during and after surgery is vital to patient satisfaction, yet not enough CRNAs are practicing UGRA, which enhances patient care.” At MTSA, CRNAs are trained to safely administer anesthesia in a variety of medical settings including operating rooms, obstetrical units and pain clinics. Ultrasound technology is one of the most recent techniques CRNAs use to administer regional anesthesia to prevent pain. “Ultrasound technology allows us to see patients’ nerves, inject pain medications around the nerves and ultimately prevent the nerves from triggering the feeling of pain to the brain,” said MTSA Director of Collaborative Learning Patrick Moss, CRNA, MS, APN. According to a recent study published in Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, the use of UGRA was positive when compared to alternative techniques. Another study published in the Oct. 2012 issue of Pain Medicine concluded that people use ultrasound technology to: achieve a higher success rate, improve safety, and teach anesthesia trainees. While the main barriers for using ultrasound technology include: lack of training, perceived decreased efficiency, and the lack of immediate availability of equipment. “When it comes to acute pain management, patients deserve the most advanced evidence-based therapies available,” said Moss. “MTSA specializes in equipping today’s CRNAs with these techniques.” Hulin says increasing access to this important training is vital, and as part of the continuing development of MTSA’s ON-Q peer-to-peer educational Center of Excellence, MTSA is in the process of building an Acute Pain Management Post-graduate Fellowship that will offer CRNAs an opportunity to rigorously prepare didactically with the support of expert clinical mentorship. About The Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia Founded in 1950, the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA) provides a Christian, Seventh-day Adventist learning environment that fosters the pursuit of truth, excellence in anesthesia practice, and a life of service, to supply needed anesthesia providers in Nashville, Middle Tennessee, the Central South, and nationally. In Middle Tennessee, more than 65 percent of nurse anesthetists are MTSA alumni, and 45 percent of all nurse anesthetists in the state graduated from the school. A leader in academic and professional excellence, MTSA is responsive to the needs of its constituents, providing affordable graduate education for students from diverse backgrounds. For more information, visit www.mtsa.edu. About Halyard Health Halyard Health (NYSE:HYH) is a medical technology company focused on preventing infection, eliminating pain and speeding recovery for healthcare providers and their patients. Headquartered in Alpharetta, Ga., Halyard is committed to addressing some of today’s most important healthcare needs, such as preventing healthcare-associated infections and reducing the use of narcotics while helping patients move from surgery to recovery. Halyard’s business segments — Surgical & Infection Prevention and Medical Devices — develop, manufacture and market clinically superior solutions that improve medical outcomes and business performance in more than 100 countries. For more information, visit www.halyardhealth.com....

Students Plant Trees in Urban Forest

By on Jan 9, 2015 in Student Success | 0 comments

Some TANA student members were recently involved in a community service project, where they planted trees in what was to become an Urban Forest.  Pictured below are Josh Voss, Josh Payne, Brittany Garret, and Omar...

Students Attend Workshop on Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

By on Jan 9, 2015 in Student Success | 0 comments

Several student TANA members recently attended a workshop held by Patrick Moss, CRNA, that focused on ultrasound-guided procedures.  This conference was held in October of 2014 at Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA).  Among the participants were the students and professionals pictured below: Megan Brown, Adam Bobo, Omali Longwell, Julia Deason, and Patrick Moss, CRNA, MS, APN, MTSA Director of Collaborative...

Memphis Student Nurse Anesthetist Foundation Wins Award!

By on Sep 15, 2014 in Student Success | 1 comment

We would like to commend the Memphis Student Nurse Anesthetist Foundation (MSNAF) on their recent achievement!  MSNAF was awarded the AANA Public Relations Award for best public relations effort by an individual, small group, organization, or company not affiliated with a state association.   Their activities and involvement this past year include: providing volunteers for several health fairs in the Memphis Metropolitan area volunteering throughout the year for the Church Health Center tutoring students at the Refugee Empowerment Program volunteering for Memphis International Airport Disaster Training Exercises offering simulation experiences for students from Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association COOL program participating in Healthy Choices Week at the University of Memphis Campus School involvement in career day activities providing guest speakers to high schools and colleges in the Memphis area to promote the profession of nurse anesthesia Congratulations to them for this well-deserved AANA recognition! The Memphis Student Nurse Anesthetist Foundation (MSNAF) is a student founded and student managed non-profit organization based in Memphis, Tennessee. MSNAF was founded in 2010 with the mission of bridging the gap between student nurse anesthetists (SRNA) and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA). Since then, this mission has been expanded to include promotion of the professional image of CRNAs; increase public awareness of CRNAs’ role in healthcare; support educational, scientific, and community events; and increase retention and promote education continuity within the profession of nurse anesthesia. To accomplish this mission, MSNAF engages in a number of community service and community outreach activities. These activities include participation in community health fairs and health screenings, providing guest speakers to area colleges and high schools to promote the CRNA profession, and providing mentors to new SRNAs in the Memphis area. In addition, MSNAF has developed an academic and need-based scholarship program for member SRNAs as well as an annual continuing education seminar for CRNAs. The activities of MSNAF are made possible by member involvement in fundraising events throughout the academic year, sponsorships, and contributions from corporate and private donors. As a result of the activities of MSNAF: • The profession of nurse anesthesia and the CRNAs role in healthcare has been introduced to over 500 nursing students in the Memphis metropolitan area. • The profession of nurse anesthesia and the CRNA’s role in healthcare has been introduced to over 150 high school students interested in health related professions. • Approximately 85 new SRNAs have been matched with mentors to ease their transition into the profession. • A new scholarship has been developed for member SRNAs. First scholarship awarded on May 16, 2014. • Continuing Education (approved by the AANA) was delivered to attendees of MSNAFs Educational weekend on May 15, 2014 and May 16, 2014. For more information about MSNAF, their events, or to make a donation to the MSNAF scholarship fund, you can contact them at msnafoundation@gmail.com or visit...

MTSA Team Launches Mission Program

By on Jul 27, 2014 in Our Super Heroes, Student Success | 0 comments

A group at Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia is currently spearheading efforts to implement a permanent service program at the school.  This mission-based initiative will send teams to provide a variety of medical services, including anesthesia for much-needed (but previously unaffordable) surgeries, in impoverished areas across the globe. To learn more about the team’s recent efforts, as well as their future plans, click here to visit The Tennessean’s website.  You can also read the full text of the article below. If it weren’t for the help of a Sumner County nurse, a 3-year-old child in Haiti would have likely died. Many lives were saved and improved in economically struggling countries within the past months because of the commitment of three local leaders who are hoping to inspire others to serve. Rachel Brown, Ken Schwab and Chris Hulin are administrators at Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia in Madison. They have embarked on multiple missionary trips lately in hopes to lay the path for a service program to launch at the institution in 2015. “We want to learn how to plan and organize these trips and figure out the logistics,” said Brown, the school’s assistant program administrator. A Gallatin native, Brown spent 15 years working as a nurse anesthetist at Hendersonville Medical Center. A nurse anesthetist works in a team with the anesthesiologist before surgeries to put patients to sleep and afterword bring them back to consciousness. “That nurse will be at the head of your hospital bed, and she or he would have the most interaction with you,” said Gallatin resident Ken Schwab, president of MTSA, which offers the only self-standing and the largest program for nurse anesthetists in the state. People wait years for surgery As part of one missionary trip in March, Brown spent a week in Haiti working with the Nashville-based nonprofit Live Beyond that is building a medical compound in the country. She provided basic first aid. An experience she won’t forget, Brown said, is when a mother walked two hours to bring her 3-year-old daughter, whose arm was burned from a hot liquid two days before. After Brown secured the wound, the mother walked the two-hour trip every day for a week so her child’s arm would be cleaned and re-bandaged. “That’s health care in Haiti,” Brown said. “There was just no other place to get care in that area. If she wasn’t treated, there was a high probability of a really bad infection because they also don’t have clean water, and her dying from that infection.” The picture was similar in January, when Brown’s mission work took her to the Dominican Republic with a team from Union University. They were the sole anesthesia providers for all surgeries in the area and had to bring their own supplies. People had waited for years to have surgery and some 200 lined to receive care. Of them, the team was able to operate on 40 patients. One of them was a woman in her 60s who had waited for five years to have a surgery on her uterus that was hanging between her legs due to weakened abdominal muscles as a result of multiple childbirths. “She had waited because she had no money,” Brown said. “It’s very uncomfortable and painful. She could’ve very easily died from infection.” Needs remains The school’s Dean and Program Administrator Chris Hulin traveled to Guatemala in November. There he and four other medics set up mobile clinics, where they treated between 100 and 150 patients a day for conditions from respiratory infection to joint pain to diabetes. “One specific 6- or 7-year-old girl wouldn’t have lived another two days because her fever was so high and her respiratory infection was so severe,” said Hulin, who lives in Portland. The team set up clinics at various locations such as schools and churches. Once they had to transform a store’s front into a clinic and its chicken yard into a waiting room. “You’re only there to help them temporarily, and there are many long-term needs,” Hulin said. “We’re looking for more opportunities to do mission trips and teach self care. There’s a lot of need for basic health-care education.” While not medical, Schwab’s mission work in February partially healed a pastor’s parsonage in Cuba. With a team from local Methodists churches, Schwab resurfaced the parsonage’s interior walls with materials, mostly brought from the U.S. “Cuba doesn’t have much to work with,” Schwab said. “It was a beautiful building that had deteriorated over the years, and the need for maintenance was significant.” Missionaries hope Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia students and staff will follow in their footsteps. “This is our demonstration of personal commitment to service,” Schwab said. “As an extension to one of our core values, we hope to communicate and install in our students and staff the importance of serving others.” Contact Dessislava Yankova at 575-7170. Follow her on Twitter @desspor. Did you know? The Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia is a higher education, single purpose Christian institution that offers two graduate programs: a Master of Science with a Focus in Anesthesia degree and a Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice degree. • 65 percent of nurse anesthetists in Middle Tennessee are MTSA alumni. • 45 percent of all nurse anesthetists in the state graduated from MTSA. • 1,500 people have graduated from MTSA worldwide Learn more at...