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Celebrating One of Healthcare’s Top Professions – January 22-28, 2017

By on Jan 23, 2017 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

This week is National CRNA Week, our time to celebrate the nation’s 50,000+ Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) and Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists (SRNAs) and the valuable role they play in our healthcare system. In today’s ever-changing healthcare environment, patients want quality, personal care that’s delivered with the highest level of safety and in the most cost-effective manner possible. CRNAs provide just that. Here are a few facts to help you learn more about the work of CRNAs and to clear up some common misconceptions about their profession.   CRNAs have been at work for over 150 years. Nurse anesthetists, as they were originally known, first began providing anesthesia to wounded soldiers during the Civil War. In fact, they’ve been the main providers of anesthesia care to U.S. military personnel on the front lines since World War I. It was in 1956 when they were officially designated with the CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) credential. CRNAs are prolific providers. Today the nation’s 50,000+ CRNAs (more than 2,500 of which are practicing in Tennessee) safely administer around 43 million anesthetics per year to patients across the U.S.* They practice in every setting where anesthesia is delivered: hospital surgical suites and delivery rooms;  ambulatory surgical centers; critical access hospitals; and the offices of dentists, opthalmologists, podiatrists, plastic surgeons, and pain management specialists; as well as U.S. military, Public Health Services, and Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities. They’re also the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management, and trauma stabilization services. In fact, CRNAs are the sole providers of anesthesia in approximately 41 of Tennessee’s 95 counties.   CRNAs have an impeccable safety record. According to a 1999 report, anesthesia care had grown almost 50 times safer than in the early 1980s. And, in a landmark study, it was confirmed that anesthesia care is equally safe whether provided by a CRNA working alone, an anesthesiologist working alone, or a CRNA working with an anesthesiologist, proving there’s essentially a 0% difference in safety between CRNAs and their physician counterparts.*** CRNAs are cost-effective providers of anesthesia. All anesthesia professionals administer anesthesia the same way, regardless of their title or educational background. Anesthesia given by a CRNA is recognized as the practice of nursing. However, when the same service is provided by an anesthesiologist, it’s recognized as the practice of medicine and thus more expensive. Since CRNAs working alone equate to a significant savings vs. the cost of an anesthesiologist (or a CRNA working with one), the result is reduced expenses for patients and insurance companies. The cost-efficient utilization of CRNAs is doing much to help control the nation’s ever-increasing healthcare spending. CRNAs are well educated. Before studying to become a CRNA students must first earn a graduate degree in nursing (or a similar field), become licensed as a registered professional nurse and/or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN), and work full-time as a registered nurse in a critical care setting for a minimum of one year. Potential CRNAs must then obtain a master’s degree from a nurse anesthesia educational program accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs and pass the National Certification Examination following graduation. Of the 115 accredited nurse anesthesia programs in the U.S., Tennessee is home to six. CRNAs work in a highly favored profession. As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs work with a high degree of autonomy and professional respect. The role they play in patient care often means the difference between life and death. CRNAs carry a great load of responsibility, and they are compensated accordingly. Becoming a nurse anesthetist was named one of the 25 hottest careers by Working Women magazine in 1989, and its popularity has continued to grow ever since. More recently, in 2016, nurse anesthesia was named the #3 healthcare job (and the #4 job overall) by U.S. News & World Report.   Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists play a vital role in ensuring access to safe, cost-effective anesthesia care for all Americans. We dedicate this week to them! Click here for more information about the work of CRNAs in your state and throughout the U.S.      *American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) 2016 Practice Profile Survey    **Institute of Medicine *** Research Triangle...

Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia to Commemorate National CRNA Week

By on Jan 18, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

  NASHVILLE, Jan. 17, 2017—Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA) is joining healthcare providers nationwide in recognizing the unique skills of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) during the 18th annual National CRNA Week Jan. 22-28. “Surgery and anesthesia can be intimidating, but nurse anesthetists are trained to stay with the patient throughout the procedure, administering their anesthetics and watching over their vital signs,” said MTSA President Dr. Chris Hulin. “Our goal during CRNA Week is to shine a spotlight on the many professionals who play this crucial role in our healthcare system.” According to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), more than 50,000 CRNAs and student registered nurse anesthetists provide anesthetics to patients in the United States each year, delivering the same safe, high-quality anesthesia care as other anesthesia professionals but at a lower cost, helping to control the nation’s rising healthcare costs. Due to its significant alumni base in the region, MTSA estimates more than two-thirds of Middle Tennesseans having surgery entrust their lives to its graduates on a daily basis. “Every day, CRNAs deliver essential healthcare in thousands of communities and are able to prevent gaps in access to anesthesia services, especially in rural, inner-city and other medically underserved areas of the country,” Hulin added. On Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 12:30 p.m., MTSA will open its doors to students, alumni and guests for a special celebration of CRNA Week with cake, ice cream and door prizes. The event will take place in the lecture hall in Building A, located at 315 Hospital Drive in Madison. The School will also post information and special messages throughout the week atwww.facebook.com/MTSAnesthesia. About CRNA Week National CRNA Week is the AANA’s annual celebration of anesthesia patient safety, helping patients, hospital administrators, healthcare professionals, policymakers, and others become more familiar with the CRNA credential and the exceptional advanced practice registered nurses who have earned it. The emphasis during this year’s CRNA Week is on safe, effective anesthesia care, including five ways in which CRNAs make a difference every day: Safety First: CRNAs are highly trained anesthesia professionals who safely administer approximately 43 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States, according to the AANA 2016 Practice Profile Survey. Rural America: CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management and trauma stabilization services. In some states, CRNAs are the sole providers in nearly 100 percent of the rural hospitals. Military Presence: Nurse anesthetists have been the main providers of anesthesia care to U.S. military personnel on the front lines since WWI. Nurses first provided anesthesia to wounded soldiers during the Civil War. Practice Settings: CRNAs practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical access hospitals; ambulatory surgical centers; the offices of dentists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists, plastic surgeons and pain management specialists; and more. Cost-Efficiency: Managed care plans recognize CRNAs for providing high-quality anesthesia care with reduced expense to patients and insurance companies. The cost-efficiency of CRNAs helps control escalating healthcare costs.   More information about the role and value of CRNAs is available from the AANA at...

Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Workshop at the TANA 79th Annual Meeting

By on Sep 30, 2016 in TANA Annual Meeting, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Join us Saturday, October 22nd for this Amazing Opportunity at a GREAT price for TANA Members! Click here to register. Introduction to Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Led by: Patrick Moss, DNAP, CRNA, APRN and his team of facilitators….. This ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop is a hands-on basic-training course utilizing live scanning models, state-of-the-art ultrasound technology, and a comprehensive no-frills approach to regional anesthesia and acute pain management. In addition to an introduction to multimodal treatment pathways and reimbursement strategies, participants will receive the benefits of small-group scanning stations (six staffed stations will be provided) as well as a reintroduction to the basic concepts of a multitude of regional anesthesia techniques. Information presented will be highly practical and immediately useful. Don’t allow technology to intimidate you. The material will be presented in a manner that will invite learning and participation. Patrick Moss, DNAP, CRNA, is a full-time faculty member at Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia (MTSA) where he serves as the Director for the Center of Excellence for Acute Pain Management. Dr. Moss has been a board-certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for 17 years, and prior to joining the faculty at MTSA, Dr. Moss provided anesthesia services in a variety of private-practice settings throughout middle Tennessee and south-central Kentucky. In addition to his current responsibilities at MTSA, Dr. Moss also provides acute pain management in multiple practice settings, serves as an acute pain management consultant and expert witness, holds basic and advanced cadaveric workshops, and is a nationally-recognized speaker on acute pain management for Halyard Health. Due to his passion for educating colleagues about acute pain management – particularly those practicing in rural or underserved areas – his doctoral work focused on determining the feasibility of telementoring (remotely guiding) other CRNAs who have limited, or no, experience in providing ultrasound-guided regional...

Support Second Harvest Food Bank at the TANA Annual Meeting

By on Oct 6, 2015 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

TANA Members, We will once again be supporting the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee by collecting food donations at the TANA Annual Meeting. If you are attending the meeting we ask that you please bring as many food items as you would like to donate.  Below is a list of the most needed items. You can find more information here about the scope of services they provide and the impact they’re making right here in our very own state.  You can also visit secondharvestmidtn.org to learn more....

Fun Run/Walk to Benefit TANA-PAC

By on Sep 29, 2015 in TANA Annual Meeting, Uncategorized | 1 comment

Don’t forget to throw in your running shoes when you pack your bags for the TANA 78th Annual Meeting!  We’re kicking off our Saturday schedule of events with a 2-mile fun run/walk, leaving from the front of the conference center. There will be lots of giveaways, as well as prizes for the fastest participants.  It’s sure to be a lot of fun, not to mention a great way to actively protect your profession as all proceeds benefit TANA-PAC!  You can register the morning of the event or any time prior by clicking...

What Has PAC Done for You Lately?

By on Jun 3, 2014 in Making an imPACt, Uncategorized | 1 comment

Let me ask you a question.  Do you have malpractice insurance, health insurance, auto or home insurance, life or disability insurance? While some individual circumstances may vary, I would venture to guess that close to 100% of you have most, if not all, of the listed insurances.  You recognize the value of things like your health, your home, and your income.  Why wouldn’t you want to make sure those important assets were protected from risks beyond your control? Now let me ask you another question.  Why not insure that your profession as a CRNA is equally protected from unforeseen attacks?  Isn’t your investment in your career worth the minimal cost?  I imagine you’d agree that it is. Just to give you an idea of some of the issues that exist to threaten your practice, here are some of the issues that PACs have addressed in the past: CRNAs’ ability to practice under physician supervision, not just anesthesiology supervision CRNAs’ ability to directly bill Medicare for our professional services Defense of CRNAs’ ability to practice using our full scope Ability to Opt Out of supervision Promotion of CRNAs as cost-effective anesthesia providers during this period of healthcare reform And the fight continues.  Here are some of the current issues that PACs are addressing: Ensuring there are enough CRNAs to handle the influx of patients resulting from the Affordable Care Act The threat of Anesthesia Assistants Maximizing CRNAs’ scope of practice, such as: VA hospitals Pain management Prescriptive authority These are all important issues that greatly affect your practice and profession.  They’re also ones that you can’t effectively fight on your own. That’s why TANA-PAC exists…to protect and defend the rights of CRNAs in our state.  By contributing to the PAC, you’re insuring your career against risks like these and many more.  We think that protection, for a recommended donation of $50 per month (or $600 per year), is a great value! Visit www.tncrna.com and contribute by clicking on the “Donate Now” banner.  We hope to raise $10,000 by July 1, 2014, and thanks to the donations we’ve received thus far we’re much closer to that target!  Please help us reach our goals so that we can continue to provide you with the best protection possible. Thank you, David Klappholz CRNA TANA-PAC Chair...